This Is How Mastering Dark Matter Could Take Us To The Stars

It's found everywhere we know how to look, and just might be nature's perfect Here's how to harness it.

This Is How Mastering Dark Matter Could Take Us To The Stars

Curated via Twitter from Forbes Tech’s twitter account….

Not only might dark matter be an unlimited fuel source (in terms of abundance) that we don’t have to carry on board with us, but it might have that perfect, 100% efficient matter-to-energy conversion potential we so strongly desire.

Not only might dark matter be an unlimited fuel source (in terms of abundance) that we don’t have to carry on board with us, but it might have that perfect, 100% efficient matter-to-energy conversion potential we so strongly desire.

Although we have yet to detect dark matter directly, its abundant presence throughout our galaxy and beyond might provide a perfect recipe for the perfect rocket fuel imaginable.

Although we have yet to detect dark matter directly, its abundant presence throughout our galaxy and beyond might provide a perfect recipe for the perfect rocket fuel imaginable.

Ubiquitously located all throughout the galaxy and far beyond, dark matter could be the perfect fuel that makes our interstellar dreams come true. Here’s the story of how.

Ubiquitously located all throughout the galaxy and far beyond, dark matter could be the perfect fuel that makes our interstellar dreams come true. Here’s the story of how.

All rockets ever envisioned require some type of fuel, but if a dark matter engine were created, new fuel is always to be found simply by traveling through the galaxy.

All rockets ever envisioned require some type of fuel, but if a dark matter engine were created, new fuel is always to be found simply by traveling through the galaxy.

In other words, if we understand dark matter correctly, there’s a free, unlimited source of energy everywhere humanity dreams of going.

As far as we understand it — and admittedly, we need to understand it a lot farther — dark matter could truly deliver our dream of the ultimate fuel.

In other words, if we understand dark matter correctly, there’s a free, unlimited source of energy everywhere humanity dreams of going.

As far as we understand it — and admittedly, we need to understand it a lot farther — dark matter could truly deliver our dream of the ultimate fuel.

That’s why the promise of a dark matter fuel source is so alluring.

That’s why the promise of a dark matter fuel source is so alluring.

The reason for this is simple: in order to produce thrust — i. e. , in order to impart an impulse to your spacecraft — you have to convert that stored chemical energy in the fuel into kinetic energy that pushes your spacecraft.

If you had a perfect, ideal fuel, it would convert 100% of your fuel’s mass into energy, enabling you to make the most efficient fuel imaginable.

If you had a perfect, ideal fuel, it would convert 100% of your fuel’s mass into energy, enabling you to make the most efficient fuel imaginable.

Because dark matter doesn’t interact with normal matter (mostly) but passes right through it, you wouldn’t have any difficulty collecting it in a specific volume of space; it would always be there as you moved through the galaxy.

Because dark matter doesn’t interact with normal matter (mostly) but passes right through it, you wouldn’t have any difficulty collecting it in a specific volume of space; it would always be there as you moved through the galaxy.

But even if you manage to contain and store your antimatter successfully and annihilate it only at the proper moment, you’ll still have a finite supply of fuel that required an incredible amount of energy to collect.

If you start off with a rocket where 99% of your initial mass is fuel, and you assume that your fuel is perfectly 100% efficient (as though it were pure matter-antimatter annihilation), you’d wind up with a final speed of 460,000 mph (740,000 kph).

If you start off with a rocket where 99% of your initial mass is fuel, and you assume that your fuel is perfectly 100% efficient (as though it were pure matter-antimatter annihilation), you’d wind up with a final speed of 460,000 mph (740,000 kph).

If we ever hope to travel across the great interstellar distances, it will require a technology that’s superior to chemical-based rockets, and hopefully that will include the discovery of a fuel that can be replenished as we traverse our path through the galaxy.

If we ever hope to travel across the great interstellar distances, it will require a technology that’s superior to chemical-based rockets, and hopefully that will include the discovery of a fuel that can be replenished as we traverse our path through the galaxy.

But even if you manage to contain and store your antimatter successfully and annihilate it only at the proper moment, you’ll still have a finite supply of fuel that required an incredible amount of energy to collect.

The reason for this is simple: in order to produce thrust — i. e. , in order to impart an impulse to your spacecraft — you have to convert that stored chemical energy in the fuel into kinetic energy that pushes your spacecraft.

Link to original article….

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