Not into the critters that come with camping? Maybe you need this tent that never touches the ground.

Not into the critters that come with camping? Maybe you need this tent that never touches the

Curated via Twitter from WIRED’s twitter account….

Making the necessary connections is tricky at first, and it requires very careful attention to figure out exactly how a segment is supposed to fit into the frame when, for example, it is labeled “B4” on both ends. (To TreePod’s credit, the instructions I received are still preliminary, so there’s still time to revamp the assembly process.

Such is the idea behind the TreePod Camper, a two-person tent that you hang from a tree with a single length of rope.

It’s easily forgotten that with a traditional tent, the ground does all the heavy lifting, so to speak, of supporting the frame.

The idea stemmed from TreePod’s first eponymous product, a smaller tent mainly designed to give kids a quick and easy treehouse that can be erected without having to set foot in a Home Depot.

Safety aside, without using a ladder, there’s no real way to hang the tent high enough so you can keep it from bottoming out on the ground once you climb inside.

About half that time involved getting the rope in the right place and hauling the tent up to meet it. (This is really the only part of the operation that requires two people.

Why sleep on the cold, hard ground when you can hoist this two-person tent up in the air?

Why sleep on the cold, hard ground when you can hoist this two-person tent up in the air?

On the plus side, there are pockets, loops, and pouches all around the sides and inner corners of the tent, plus a low divider designed to keep two people from rolling atop one another.

If it’s not yet obvious, this isn’t a tent that you’re going to carry into the woods on your back.

TreePod offers instructions on how to securely attach your rope (not provided) to the tree, but you’re well advised to refresh your knowledge of clove hitches and other knots before you get too far along.

Suspending the tent in the air changes that calculus, which means you need a much heftier framework to ensure the tent keeps its shape.

Still, without careful guy-wire staking, the tent spins or tilts to one side unless you manage to perfectly balance the human contents inside.

This is actually the most difficult part of the process, as you’ll need to find a limb that is both high and thick enough to support the 500 pound capacity of the Camper, yet low enough to sling a rope over.

Link to original article….

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