Oracle loses $10B JEDI cloud contract appeal yet again – TechCrunch

Oracle was never fond of the JEDI cloud contract process, that massive $10 billion, decade-long Department of Defense cloud contract that went to a single It was forever arguing to anyone who would listen that that process was faulty and favored Amazon. Yesterday it lost another round in co…

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In November 2018, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) denied Oracle’s protest that it favored Amazon or any of the other points in their complaint.

Court of Appeals rejected the database giant’s argument that the procurement process was flawed because it went to a single vendor.

Even with that determination, the deal remains tied up in litigation as Amazon has filed multiple complaints, alleging that the president interfered with the deal and that they should have won on merit.

Oracle was never fond of the JEDI cloud contract process, that massive $10 billion, decade-long Department of Defense cloud contract that went to a single vendor.

Further, the court found that Oracle’s case didn’t have merit in some cases because it failed to meet certain basic contractual criteria.

In fact, even before the RFP had been released in April 2018, CEO Safra Catz brought complaints to the president that the bid favored Amazon.

On the latter point, the court wrote, “The court addressed the question whether the contracting officer had properly assessed the impact of the conflicts on the procurement and found that she had.

This represents the third time the company has tried to appeal the process in some way, four if you include direct executive intervention with the president.

In other cases, it didn’t find that the DoD violated any specific procurement rules with this bidding process.

It’s worth noting that for all its complaints that the deal favored Amazon, Microsoft actually won the bid.

It also didn’t buy that there was a conflict of interest because a former Amazon employee was involved in writing the DoD’s request for proposal criteria.

The following month, the company filed a $10 billion lawsuit in federal court, which was denied last August.

It was forever arguing to anyone who would listen that that process was faulty and favored Amazon.

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