Hitting the Books: Lessons learned from gaming with the King of Sweden

Video games have come a long way from their dim arcade In his new book, The Dream Architects: Adventures in the Video Game Industry, author David Polfeldt examines both the rise of video games as a cultural and commercial force as well as his own experiences in eventually becoming the Managing Director of Massive Entertainment. In the excerpt below, Polfeldt recalls the time the King of Sweden’s staff rang up the Massive offices asking for a tour as well as the realizations His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf managed to elicit with but a simple question.

Curated via Twitter from Engadget’s twitter account….

In his new book, The Dream Architects: Adventures in the Video Game Industry, author David Polfeldt examines both the rise of video games as a cultural and commercial force as well as his own experiences in eventually becoming the Managing Director of Massive Entertainment.

You gotta be humble in Sweden! “I don’t really understand why games work so well? ” the king continued, his statement taking on the tone of a question. “Uh. You mean technically? ” I asked, a bit confused, expecting to explain relatively basic hardware and software stuff. “No,” he said. “As a medium.

Is it possible that video games are better, more powerful, and even more democratic than TV, movies, theater, opera, music, radio, literature, or any other kind of classic media?

In the excerpt below, Polfeldt recalls the time the King of Sweden’s staff rang up the Massive offices asking for a tour as well as the realizations His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf managed to elicit with but a simple question.

Then I remembered my manners and quickly added, “Your Majesty. Yes? ” I’d been told not to address the royal presence by his name, Carl Gustaf, or with a common “you. “Your Majesty!

No longer a mere niche diversion for pasty, maladjusted youth, gaming is now an integral part of modern pop culture standing shoulder to shoulder with “classical” forms of media like films, televisions and literature.

There seems to be a question? ” I added with emphasis. “I might be stupid, but I wonder something,” he said, in a classic display of the Swedish tradition of downplaying oneself.

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