This Labor Day, spare a thought for the workers who made your doorstep delivery possible – TechCrunch

This Labor Day, it’s time to think about how corporations can better support and protect this vital but often forgotten segment of the

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StrongArm has also helped keep workers safe during the pandemic by launching a new suite of capabilities on its FUSE platform, including CDC communication, proximity alerts (i. e. , notifications to workers within six feet of one another), and exposure analysis (understanding who has interacted with whom, at what time, and for what duration, exposing any potential contact transfer with accuracy).

After service workers, like firefighters and police, transportation/shipping and manufacturing/production rank second and third as the occupations with the largest number of workplace injuries resulting in days away from work.

While people recognize the contributions of frontline workers they can see like doctors and nurses, postal carriers and grocery store workers, there’s an entire hidden infrastructure of logistics workers that keeps the online economy humming.

In June 2020, the company announced that it was launching a disinfecting AMR that can decontaminate spaces larger than 100,000 square feet in 1. 5 hours, helping workers stay safe and get back to work quicker amid the spread of the virus.

Currently, there is no standard solution to preventing workplace injuries while lowering costs, leaving workers like Jack without adequate protections.

This can relieve the burden of heavy lifting from human workers and ensure that conditions, like heat, remain safe in work environments.

For the foreseeable future, corporations will depend on logistics workers and have a responsibility to protect the safety of those workers.

In its report titled, “The Impact of COVID-19 on Tech Innovation,” Lux Research found that the outbreak of COVID-19 will likely push corporations with major manufacturing and logistics operations to assess the potential of robotics.

It was loaded and unloaded onto trucks in Indiana, Illinois, Colorado, Nevada and finally California and handled by an unknown number of logistics workers along the way, many of them in the middle of the night.

That was true before COVID-19, but the pandemic gave the issue a renewed urgency, prompting workers from Amazon, Walmart, Target and FedEx, among others, to organize walkouts.

These enhanced capabilities can get workers back to work faster, earning vitally needed income while reducing COVID-19 risk by 95%.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 5% of warehouse workers in the U. S. experience an injury on the job each year—higher than the national average.

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