The Nubia Watch Is Less Futuristic Than it Looks

A curved AMOLED smartwatch sounds like the stuff of science fiction, and the Nubia Watch has certainly been described as futuristic—including by yours truly, who has used the word to explain the watch to coworkers and But after wearing one for over a week, it’s more 2016 than 2020, much less like anything from the future.

Curated via Twitter from Gizmodo’s twitter account….

While crowdfunded gadgets are notorious for vaporware, one thing the Nubia Watch’s campaign has going for it is that it’s already fully funded. (Of course, that’s not an ironclad guarantee this thing will ever ship. ) Supposedly, the watch will be available to the general public in October for $400, while early birds on Kickstarter can nab it for $200.

It’s also kinda neat that when you swipe up for notifications, you can scroll quite far thanks to the extended length. (That said, you can see some pixels if you look closely, which not terribly surprising because the display has a pixel density of 244 ppi. ) It’s just that, uh, outside of the various watch faces, the software and apps aren’t really optimized for this screen.

That said, I could see future versions of the Nubia Watch being better, once there are more reliable apps and features that make use of its unique screen.

A curved AMOLED smartwatch sounds like the stuff of science fiction, and the Nubia Watch has certainly been described as futuristic—including by yours truly, who has used the word to explain the watch to coworkers and friends.

Meanwhile, the Nubia Watch is a curved 4. 01-inch flexible display that wraps around your wrist.

The Nubia Watch is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 chip… which is what most Wear OS watches (then Android Wear) were using prior to 2018.

I granted permission, got a list of songs to show up on the Nubia app, and even selected which ones I wanted to import. They just… never made it onto the watch before things crashed.

Given the rigidity of the “lugs” and the fact this watch weighs 3. 4 ounces, the Nubia Watch actually reminded me of another chunky, uncomfortable behemoth—the 3-year-old LG Watch Sport.

I went on three runs with the Nubia Watch, and each time it struggled to find a GPS signal, despite having built-in GPS.

There’s a simple reason for that: The Nubia Watch is not comfortable to wear for an extended period of time.

Heart rate, however, was on par with my Polar H10 chest strap and the Apple Watch Series 5, which were worn simultaneously with the Nubia Watch.

The Nubia Watch isn’t as laggy as those watches were, but there are times when swiping doesn’t feel smooth.

If you’re wearing the watch, you might have to twist your wrist to see anything on this side.

Like many gadget nerds, most of what I knew about the Nubia Watch, and its predecessor the Nubia Alpha, came from first-look write-ups and videos of the device on YouTube.

Link to original article….

Related videos from YouTube

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